WELCOME TO THE VIRTUAL HOME OF BRONSON L. PARKER. A native of Tennessee, "Bo" is a former journalist and writer of historical non-fiction. His creative writing career began after retirement from his day job as an appointed public servant in his adopted town of Hampton, VA. "It isn't a gipe site," he says. "If I enjoy something I read, or learn something about the writing game that I think is worthwhile, I'll have a few comments to make. His goal is to make it a fun site, both to write and, hopfully, to read.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Adjusting to the New Normal; Looking to Get Back to Old Routines




After weeks of working with a prosthesis containing a built-in mini computer to control the knee joint, things didn’t progress as hoped. Bounding about in a semi-normal fashion requires a second, healthy knee. One damaged a lifetime ago from high school and college football does not do the job. The old football injuries reared their head. There were some serious objections when forced to carry a heavier load.

The next step scheduled is a meeting with an orthopedist who specializes in knee joints. Is the guy any good? We’ll see. He handles all knee problems for the Carolina Hurricanes, the local team in the National Hockey League. Will a prosthesis be a part of my future? It all depends on what the orthopedist tells me.

So, I’ve done two things to move life back to something as near to normal as before the amputation. I’ve relocated into a community that offers more of what a one-legged guy needs to make life easier. 

The second thing is that I am refocusing my energies on the second manuscript in the Joe McKibben series. This manuscript would be much closer to being sent off to Kimberly at Bookbiz to convert for Kindle and Create Space had I not last summer engaged in what proved to be a very stupid move.

It started as a luncheon discussion with another writer. We had both just finished reading a book (1st person POV) where every sentence was loaded with “I.”
 “Wonder if first person could be done with out ever using ‘I’?”
 My friend replied, “You could try it with that McKibben thing you’re working on,”

Well, I did it. Not a single “I” except in dialogue. It was the single most stupid thing I’ve done in fifty plus years of word cobbling.

Now it’s easy to eliminate the “I”s. But it’s means slipping into passive voice, which does not seem so bad when doing it. However, my thanks to a group of readers who in kindly words told me I should know better. They all voted as a bloc, “Get rid of the passive voice.”

It’s a perfect example of the situation where each test reader suggests a different thing to change. Each suggestion can be reviewed, and can be ignored. But when all speak with one voice about the same thing, it’s time to take notice and make changes. I can assure everyone that getting rid of passive-voice segments is hard. Using it is easy, like eating gummy bears without realizing what you’re doing. So, learn exactly what is meant by passive voice and avoid it.  







2 comments:

cncbooks said...

Bo, it's so good to have you back and I'm really looking forward to Joe's next adventure ;-)

Lelia Taylor

Linda Lyons-Bailey (for GBM4cure) said...

Oh,my gosh! Hope you are OK.